Wednesday Link Roundup #68: History News and Writing Tips Fit to Post

Franklin RoundupWednesday Link Roundup: Links to the most interesting history, news, writing, and technology posts that passed through my RSS and Twitter feeds over the last week.

 

History

The lion and unicorn have been removed from atop the Old State House in Boston for conservation. Inside the lion’s head conservators found a “113-Year-Old Time Capsule.”

Albert Gallatin who? Scott Smith of Investor’s Business Daily attempts to bring notice to this forgotten founder in “Albert Gallatin’s Wizardry Saved Early U.S. Economy.”

Ariel Sabar asks “Did Marco Polo ‘Discover’ America?

Did you play the Oregon Trail computer game? Did you know there is a live version of the game? See “Going West: The World of Live Action, Competitive Oregon Trail” for more details.

nurseHannah Bailey discusses the benefits of “Researching en Français: French Archives, And Why Their Worth It for All Early Amercanists.”

Robert Huddleston asks and explores “What Do We Get From Novels About World War II?

Do you use edited volumes of documents? Are you thinking about a career in documentary editing? See, “Making the Adams Papers” by Assistant Editor Sara Georgini.

Smithsonian Magazine offers a wonderful array of postcards that depict “The Evolution of the Nurse Stereotype via Postcards: From Drunk to Saint to Sexpot to Modern Medical Professional.”

Hugh T. Harrington discusses the importance and origins of “The Great West Point Chain.”

Historic New England has released the latest video in its “Haymarket Project” documentary series.

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Boston Historical Events for the Week of September 29, 2014

Boston Historical EventsBoston Historical Events: A list of history-related events taking place in Boston between Monday September 29 and Sunday October 5, 2014.

 

Boston-by-Foot.gifBoston By Foot

 Thursday, October 2, 6-7:30pm, Walking Tour, 290 Congress Street, $5 Members/$15 Nonmembers, Tickets Required

Join Boston by Foot for the “Tipsy Tour: Dram Shops & Drunken Sailors,” a tour about pubs, booze, and the exploits of the intoxicated. Your guide will share stories about the role alcohol has played throughout Boston’s history, from the early days of settlement through the era of Prohibition. Along the way you will learn about how “Ice King” King Solomon and Admiral Edward Vernon had their lives “stirred and shaken” by hooch and about John Hancock’s involvement with Madeira. Meet your guide at the boat dock beside 290 Congress Street.

 

BPL.gifBoston Public Library

Amazon ImageMonday, September 29, 6-7:00pm, Author Talk, Copley Square, Free

Historians Karen Corsano and Daniel Williman will discuss their new book John Singer Sargent and His Muse: Painting Love and Loss. Their biography sheds new light on John Singer Sargent’s art by examining the intimate history of his family.  Corsano and Williman will discuss Sargent’s artwork and the never-before-told story of his niece and muse, Rose-Marie Ormond.

 

Amazon ImageThursday, October 2, 6:30-7:30pm, Author Talk, Brighton Branch, Free

Local historian Anthony Sammarco will discuss details from his new book, The Baker Chocolate Company: A Sweet History. In this illustrated lecture, Sammarco will provide both bitter and sweet aspects of the delicious saga of the Baker Chocolate Company. A book signing will follow.

 

Historic-New-England-300x272.jpgHistoric New England

Saturday, October 4, 11am-1pm, Walking Tour, Otis House, $6 Members/$12 Nonmembers, Tickets Required

Join Historic New England for a walking tour of Beacon Hill. Your knowledgeable guide will take you beyond the neighborhood’s charming brick sidewalks and gardens. On this tour you will learn about Beacon Hill’s development during the Federal era and the stories behind the fortunes, ambitions, and struggles of the neighborhood’s early residents, not all of whom had a lot of money. The program will start with a tour of the Otis House.

 

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French and Indian War Tour 2014

French and Indian War Tour MapOn September 13, 2014, Tim and I embarked on a week-long cruise of coastal Canada.

Our ports of call included Halifax, Nova Scotia, Sydney, Nova Scotia, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Québec City, Québec, and Montréal, Québec.

Tim called this trip our vacation; I called it our “French and Indian War Tour.”

In this post you will find information about the sites I saw during my “French and Indian War Tour.”

Tip: Did you know that you can make my photos larger by clicking on them?

 

Halifax, Nova Scotia

I had to make tough choices about the history sites and museums I wanted to visit during out 8.5 hours in Halifax.

In the end, I chose a full-day trip to Grand Pré and a Nova Scotia winery in the Annapolis Valley.

Located along the Bay of Fundy’s Minas Basin, Grand Pré stands as a UNESCO World Heritage Site that memorializes the Expulsion of the Acadians by the British between 1755 and 1764.

Grand PreAcadians are descended from French colonists who settled in Nova Scotia during the 1680s.

Many of the colonists established farms on the rich alluvial soils along the Bay of Fundy. The farmers constructed a system of dykes and wooden sluices to drain and protect their land from the Bay’s extreme tidal range of 40-60 feet.

Both Great Britain and France claimed sovereignty over Nova Scotia. As a result, imperial warfare caused the island to change hands several times between 1700 and 1755. Each war ended with Great Britain returning the island to France, until the French and Indian War; the Treaty of Paris 1763 ended the war and awarded Nova Scotia to the Great Britain.

Neither the French nor the British trusted the Acadians. During each war, the farmers declared neutrality. In theory, they refused to supply either army with supplies, weapons, or men. In practice, both the French and British armies extracted assistance from the Acadians by threatening their families and property holdings.

In 1755, the British officers worried that the Acadians would reverse their hard-won victory over the French Army. They feared that the Acadians would invite French soldiers to attack them and assist the French effort.

The British military lessened its fears by expelling the Acadians from Nova Scotia.

The Grand Pré World Heritage Site tells the story of the British Expulsion of the Acadians (1755-1764). Exhibit placards and a multimedia show present information about the Acadian diaspora from both Acadian and British points of view. An exhibit in the visitor center also depicts how the Acadians drained and protected their land with dykes and wooden sluices using sizable models.

Sydney, Nova Scotia

Our stop in Sydney afforded Tim and I the opportunity to visit the most contested site in colonial North America: Fortress Louisbourg.

The Treaty of Utrecht (1713) ended Queen Anne’s War (1702-1713), but its articles did little to assuage French fears that the British might seize all of their possessions in North America. The articles awarded Great Britain all North American lands along the Atlantic seaboard with the exception of Île Royale (Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia).

LouisbourgThe French sought to strengthen its hold of Île Royale. Between 1720 and 1740 they built a large fortress near a prosperous fishing village on the northeastern tip of the island. The French called the fortress and the settlement around it Louisbourg and they protected both with a massive stone wall.

New Englanders despised the French presence in New France. Not only were the French predominately Catholic, but between 1689 and 1713, French soldiers and Native Americans raided frontier settlements in the region. The Yankees feared that the French would use Louisbourg as an additional base from which to attack them.

In 1745, New Englanders seized the opportunity afforded by King George’s War (1744-1748) to attack Louisbourg. Against the odds, the Yankees captured the fortress and its town. However, their possession proved short-lived. In 1748 the Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle ceded Louisbourg back to the French.

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Wednesday Link Roundup #67: New Netherland Commemorated, Historians Get Savvy with Evernote

Samuel Adams RoundupWednesday Link Roundup: Links to the most interesting history, news, writing, and technology posts that passed through my RSS and Twitter feeds over the last week.

 

History

Russell Shorto considered “The Source of New York’s Greatness” in a piece that commemorates the English conquest of New Netherland on September 8, 1664.

The New-York Historical Society also commemorated the anniversary of the conquest of New Netherland with a look at a 1730 English-Dutch Dictionary in “What New York Slang Did We Get from the Dutch?

Rachel Hermann shares early thoughts concerning her second book project in “A Humorous(?) Post about People Traveling by Canoe.”

Mental Floss posted “The U.S. Map Redrawn as 50 States with Equal Population.”

 

State of the Profession

The American Historical Association shared “The 2012-2013 Survey of Humanities Departments: Some Takeaway for Historians.”

 

Technology for Research & Education

Janice Liedle discusses how she uses Evernote as a tool for her research and teaching in “Everloving Evernote.”

Raul Pancheco-Vega shares his views on the app in “Using Evernote in Academic Research and Teaching.”

 

typewriterWriting

Stephen King divulged how he teaches writing in “How Stephen King Teaches Writing.”

Do you write with a to-do list? If so, you might find a helpful resource in “The New Habit Challenge: Create a Better To-Do List.”

 

Writer Platform

Kimberly Grabas added a fifth installment to her “Email List Building Series” in “Strategies to Grow Your List, Your Reach, and Your Sales.”

Unboxed Writer Annie Neugebauer shares “Everything You Need to Know About @Reply” for Twitter.

 

Thoughtful-WomanWhat Do You Think?

What is the best article, book, or blog post that you have read lately?

 

 

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Boston Historical Events for the Week of September 22, 2014

Boston Historical EventsBoston Historical Events: A list of history-related events taking place in Boston between Monday September 22 and Sunday September 28, 2014.

 

Boston by FootBoston By Foot

Sunday, September 28, 2-3:30pm, Walking Tour, Harbor Park, $5 Members/ $15 Non-members, Tickets Required

Join Boston by Foot for their Tour of the Month: The South Boston Seaport. Over the last 150 years, the Seaport District has transformed from a tidal flat into an industrial area, a district for Innovation, and most recently into a new nightspot for entertainment. This neighborhood of new and exciting developments did not exist in the early 19th century. The South Boston Seaport tour guide will discuss the creation of this district, its maritime and industrial history, and the city’s plans for its future. Meet your guide at Harbor Park, located just outside the Moakley Federal Courthouse.

 

imagesAmazon ImageFramingham State University

Wednesday, September 24, 4:30pm, Book Talk, McCarthy Center Forum, Free

John Demos (Yale University) will discuss his new book, The Heathen School: A Story of Hope and Betrayal in the Age of the Early Republic, which unravels the forgotten story of a special school for “heathen youth” brought to New England in the early 19th century from all corners of the earth. Located in Cornwall, Connecticut, this institution promoted the philosophy: convert them, educate them, civilize them, then send them back to found similar projects in their respective homelands. After a seemingly brilliant beginning, however, the plans ran afoul of racism, when some of the heathen students courted local women.

 

Historic-New-England-300x272.jpgHistoric New England

Tuesday, September 23, 7-8:30pm, Lecture, Otis House, Free, Registration Required

Professor Brock Jobe (Winterthur Program in American Material Culture) and Sarah Parks (Boston Furniture Archive) will share the discoveries they made about furniture over the summer. Over the past 3 months, a team of interns and volunteers identified and photographed hundreds of pieces of furniture that were made in Boston between 1630 and 1930. Jobe and Parks will share their most exciting finds in this illustrated lecture.

 

Saturday, September 27, 11am-1pm, Walking Tour, Otis House, $6 Members/$12 Nonmembers, Tickets Required

Join Historic New England for a walking tour of Beacon Hill. Your knowledgeable guide will take you beyond the neighborhood’s charming brick sidewalks and gardens. On this tour you will learn about Beacon Hill’s development during the Federal era and the stories behind the fortunes, ambitions, and struggles of the neighborhood’s early residents, not all of whom had a lot of money. The program will start with a tour of the Otis House.

 

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